Puppy Love at the SPCA

Dog BowlI held out as long as I could.  In this case, it wasn’t very long at all.

After our second dog died in January, I simply found the house too empty.  After all, the other dog died last year, the last gerbil died last year, and my youngest child moved out on her own last year.

After only a few weeks, I needed a dog in the house.  I started dropping hints to the husband, who was adamant that no way would we get another one.  I didn’t much care what he said – I kept searching the SPCA website.

Last week, the SPCA posted pictures of some adorable young dogs, and I upped my campaign, finally ending with,

“If we’re staying in this house, we’re getting another dog.  If we’re not getting another dog, then we’re selling the house and moving into a 55+ apartment. “

Hubby opted for the apartment.

Ok, so I pretty much let it go.  I prefer my house, dog-less or otherwise.

But then, the SPCA posted puppy pictures – 6-month-old “hound/shepherd mix.” In our usual mid-morning telephone conversation (we both work), I idly mentioned seeing those photos and that it was too bad we were going into an apartment and couldn’t get one of those puppies.

A few minutes later, I received a text message:  “Send me those puppy pictures.”

Now, we all know that when the SPCA gets puppies in, they get adopted really fast.  On the spur of the moment, hubby and I agreed to meet at the SPCA and “just take a look.”  Need I mention how fast I drove?

But before I left, I called the SPCA to verify the pups were still there and to find out if we were in their records from when we adopted our Morgan 13 years ago.  The receptionist looked up my name and said, with a chill in her voice:  “I see you surrendered a guinea pig?

I patiently explained to her that, no, the guinea pig had died of old age at home, and I merely brought him in to be properly cremated, rather than simply bury him in our back yard where the dogs could dig him up.  I then asked her to look up my husband’s name, and won’t wonders never cease, we were still on record.  Thus saving us from having to fill out new paperwork if we wished to adopt.

Well, wouldn’t you know it – the pups, while absolutely gorgeous, turned out to be the size of ponies, and we didn’t want a dog that would top out at more than 50 lbs., having realized after our 90-lb German Shepherd that too large a dog might be too much now that we are older.

No DogsAt that point, I figured I wasn’t meant to get a puppy after all.

But then, hubby began dropping hints that he might want another purebred German Shepherd, so a couple of days later I started calling breeders.  No one had litters coming up, and the price ($1,000.00 or more) would really be pushing that household budget.  What would happen if we paid that much for a dog and then had some major household emergency?

Just as I got off the phone with the last breeder, I glanced again at the SPCA web page – at that very moment, new puppy info was posted:  4-month-old “mixed German Shepherd” puppies!  I called the husband, resulting in my leaving work immediately for an early lunch.

There were 4 puppies- 3 girls, 1 boy.  In the 20 minutes it took me to get to the SPCA, one of the girls had already been adopted and was awaiting pick-up, and she was breathtakingly beautiful.  The other pups were no slouches, either.  I had my eye on the boy, and called my hubby – we had already agreed that I could make a decision if the size and breed were right, but I wanted to just touch base.  You do that if you’re married, and especially if the hubby will ultimately be the one walking and picking up after the 50+-lb dog.

I had to walk outside to get good reception.  And wouldn’t you know it – by the time I walked back in, another couple were in the process of adopting my little boy!    The wife gave me that “Stay away from my dog” stare.  Damn!

There were still 2 girls left, so I had the smaller one taken into a room where I could play with her, and where I could call hubby again.  The intention was that if I didn’t like this one, I could then look at the remaining unadopted puppy.

But even while I was playing with my possible new puppy, a young man kept walking past the glass wall of the room where I was and eyeing the puppy I was playing with.  He even went so far as to tap the glass and wave to the puppy.  I now understood that evil stare from that other lady.  I knew if I let “my” puppy out of my hands to check out her sister, both puppies would be adopted before I could say boo.  So with my husband’s phone permission (sounds a little dirty, doesn’t it?), I paid to have a hold put on my new puppy so that hubby could come after work to see her for himself.

Good thing, too, ’cause while I was playing with my soon-to-be-adopted puppy, her sister was being adopted.  I could have lost both dogs in the blink of an eye.  Potential puppy owners are more aggressive than the dogs they’re adopting.

After work, my husband and I met at the SPCA again, and I was really worried he would hate the puppy.  She is more Golden Retriever than German Shepherd, and she is slightly larger than we wanted – probably will top out at about 60 lbs.  The puppy was brought into the viewing room, and seemed more hesitant than she was earlier, possibly because she had just spent the last 15 minutes puppy fighting with her sister.  She whimpered when she saw her sister being taken down the hall.

But then, she came over and curled up against me, with her head near my heart – and when my husband spoke to her, she wagged her little tail just enough.

And the rest, as they say, is history.

PUPPY1

Cody at the SPCA

Meet Cody – the Golden-Shepherd.  Never thought I’d wind up with a “designer breed”!

__________

I love to hear from my readers.  You may comment on this post, comment on my Facebook page, or email me at cordeliasmom2012@yahoo.com

__________

Images by: Joey Rozier/mrjoro, and hugovk, and Cordelia’s Mom, respectively

This entry was posted in Pets, Relationships, That's Life and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to Puppy Love at the SPCA

  1. tlf says:

    Good for you! Hope she turns out to be sheer joy for you.

    Like

    • Thanks. I’m so looking forward to it – I even took the week off as vacation so she’ll have more time to adjust. But I admit I’m a little nervous – it’s been 13 years since I had to deal with a puppy.

      Like

  2. Charlotte says:

    Cody is beautiful!!! Congratulations! One of our 2 German shepherds is a rescue from the shelter and she is a great dog.

    Like

    • I love German Shepherds – our Riggsie was huge, but one of the most loving dogs ever. I think mixing in the Golden Retriever will make for a very loving, but still innately protective, dog. I can’t wait! BTW, if you’re willing to shed a tear or two, read my Changes and Losses II – Life’s Sequel post about my Riggsie and Morgan. As a dog owner, I know you’ll understand.

      Like

      • Charlotte says:

        Gus and Grace are the first shepherds I have had and they are wonderful! Super sweet with our 2.5 month old, they always check on her throughout the day. Gus is about 100 pounds and Grace is a little one at about 60 pounds.

        Like

  3. Teela Hart says:

    Good story. I love happy endings, when you have to brave the masses it can get sketchy. 🙂

    Like

    • Not the first time. Our Morgan was also an SPCA dog, and she was the only female of the litter. While I was in the process of adopting her, another woman came up to me and said, “But I wanted the girl puppy!” “Sorry,” I replied, “she’s mine now.” What is it about those cute little puppies that brings out the worst in us during adoption time? I was literally ready to deck that lady if she tried to even pet “my dog.”

      Like

  4. nice read, glad you got a puppy!

    Like

  5. ADDENDUM: When I first adopted Cody, I was told she had been brought in from Franklin County. I assumed that meant Franklin County, New York. When I got her paperwork, I learned she is from Franklin County, Kentucky – got me a Southern Belle!

    Like

  6. Pingback: A Three Dog Night | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  7. Pingback: Awesome August | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  8. Pingback: September Falls | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  9. Pingback: Changes and Losses II: Life’s Sequel | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  10. Pingback: October Only | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  11. Pingback: Spam-Bam Thank You Ma’am (July 2014) | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  12. Pingback: November, Naturally | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  13. Pingback: Is CookieCakes a Winner Yet? | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  14. Pingback: Spam-Bam Thank You Ma’am (November 2014) | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  15. Pingback: Hi Ho, Hi Ho, It’s Back to Work I Go | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  16. Pingback: Bitter-Sweet: The Liebster Award | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  17. Pingback: BE MY GUEST, BE MY GUEST! | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  18. Pingback: What the FRAP was THAT? | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  19. Pingback: A Good Old Boy | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  20. Pingback: Where In the World Are My Readers? | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  21. Pingback: Puppy Cody Puts On Her Big-Girl Pants/Steps Up to the Plate/Does Her Job | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  22. Pingback: Changes and Losses II: Life’s Sequel (Re-Blog) | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  23. Pingback: ANIMAL HOUSE, PART III: Doggy Do | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  24. Pingback: CORDELIA’S MOM’S CHRISTMAS NEWSLETTER (’cause we all love newsletters so much) | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  25. Pingback: When the Idea Fairy Goes On Sabbatical | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  26. Pingback: The Important Room (Re-Blog) | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  27. Pingback: Mantra | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  28. Pingback: Why Dogs Are Bad For Your Health (Re-Blog) | Cordelia's Mom, Still

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s