The Christmas Kitten (Guest Post by Paul Curran)

MERRY CHRISTMAS, EVERYONE!

ChristmasKitten

THE CHRISTMAS KITTEN

By: Paul Curran

PaulCurran

 

Christmas Eve, 11:35 pm, Thousand Oaks, California

The faint but strident meowing woke me up. Lying in bed, I opened my eyes and listened: “Meooow, Meooow”. The sound was coming from outside the motel room. It repeated twice more as I climbed out of bed and struggled into my pants in the faint light filtering through the drapes. My friend Elroy was still snoring in the next bed over. The air conditioning was a deep background rumble holding the 90 degree night at bay. I opened the motel door, making sure it was unlocked so I wouldn’t wake up Elroy, and stepped outside into the heat. The meowing got louder.

Elroy’s Kenworth tractor sat parked in front of the motel room, a dark shadow looming in the night. It was alone in the lot, as we were the only guests at the motel over Christmas. We had hauled a flatbed load into LA a few days ago and dispatch couldn’t load us back to Eastern Canada until after Christmas – so we were laid over.  My truck was at Caterpillar in Halifax for an engine job, and because of the holidays, it was going to take a week at least. Elroy had been dispatched a hotshot load (a super rush load going directly from shipper to receiver without stopping for anything but food, fuel, and bathroom breaks) going from Halifax to LA and requiring two drivers– 3,600 miles and we had 72 hours to get there. The load was light and Elroy’s engine was large, so we could cruise at the speed limit or a bit above and run 24 hours a day with the two of us. It was a sweet run that paid amazingly, and we actually delivered early.

I walked up the walkway calling out softly for the cat. The meowing got louder, and a small grey kitten appeared around the corner. She was still meowing loudly as she rushed up to me and began to twine around my legs. At what looked to be no more than 15 or 16 weeks old, she was scrawny but her hair was short enough that it appeared neatly groomed. I bent down and picked her up, and talking to her as she meowed with what sounded like happiness, I carried her back to the motel room. She was very light and obviously too thin and hungry. I opened the room door and set the kitten down inside while she still meowed. This woke up Elroy and he turned on the lights and inquired what I was doing. I explained the hungry kitten and asked if we had any food or snacks.

Unfortunately there was no food to be had and I could not let the kitten go hungry. Elroy said he had seen an open fast food restaurant open down the road, so I asked to borrow the truck and made a burger run. The closest they had to cat food was a fish burger so I got two for the cat and a couple of hamburgers for Elroy and me. Returning to the motel room, I opened the fish burgers first, and the young kitten jumped on them as if she was starving, which she likely was. She tore into them, eating the fish patties, which I separated out for her, and then a small amount of the buns and condiments too.  Elroy and I watched as we munched our own food and discussed the kitten. There was no way a kitten that small had survived alone – a big bird could have carried her off – and yet she obviously did not have an owner. It was all commercial buildings around here and no homes. There was a 24-hour restaurant next door which had been open until yesterday and then, when we returned from sight seeing in the afternoon, it was covered with a huge tarp marked with poison symbols. Coming from a cold climate, I had never seen this before and so I inquired at the front desk. Apparently, once a year – often round a slow time – many restaurants and food establishments in tropical areas were closed and then tarped and sprayed for insect and vermin control. Elroy and I speculated that the kitten had been either fed by the restaurant employees or had lived off the scraps in the garbage until yesterday.

Meanwhile, the stuffed kitten was looking for company and had jumped up on my bed where she was still meowing and prancing around. We turned out the lights and Elroy wanted the kitten out, but I convinced him to allow her to stay in the air conditioning.

The kitten started burrowing under my blanket and when I set her on the floor she jumped on Elroy. After he set her on the floor and she jumped back on my bed, I finally gave up and put her outside. She meowed for a bit and then went quiet.

***

DisneyChristmas

Christmas Day, 07:10 am, Thousand Oaks, California

The next morning – Christmas Day – I woke early and checked outside. The kitten came running into the room and introduced herself all over again, rubbing legs and furniture and crawling around under the blankets on the bed, all the while meowing loudly.  I got ready first and took the truck to get the kitten some takeout breakfast. Thankfully, there were a few restaurants open on this holiday, and I returned with some eggs and sausage for our furry friend. I gave her a bit of milk and a clean ashtray full of water.

Elroy and I had planned to spend the day at Disneyland – which, for you non-Californians, is not only open Christmas Day, but enjoys its busiest day of the year. So, we put the kitten out and headed off on our adventure.

Returning that evening, we picked up some cat food and some plastic bowls at an open   convenience store on the way back. We weren’t back long before the kitten reappeared, meowing at the door. I had opened the cat food with a jack-knife and had filled the bowls with food and water. She partook of supper and then went back outside.

***

TNS-SPT740-2

Boxing Day, 08:00 am, Thousand Oaks, California

The next morning the kitten was nowhere to be found. Mid-morning, we received a call from our dispatch that we had to reload oil field equipment in Houston in two days –  a 1,500 mile run empty. That meant we would have to leave immediately. The load was going to the offshore oil rig supply boats in St. John’s Newfoundland – 3,400 miles east of Houston. The oilfield paid very well, more than enough to offset the long empty miles. Elroy packed the truck, paid our tab, and hooked up to the trailer while I looked for the kitten. I knew we couldn’t take her with us but I was almost frantic trying to find the little kitten. I had put fresh food and water outside the room that morning for her, but she hadn’t touched it. The thought of leaving the tiny defenseless kitten alone was crushing. I had become very attached to her over the last few days- far too attached.

Eventually Elroy was ready to go, and I had to climb up into the cab. I was broken hearted that the kitten was nowhere to be found. Elroy asked what the problem was, and I told him I was having a hard time leaving the kitten alone – that I was afraid it would get injured or killed, being so young. He pointed out that it was unrealistic to look for a small kitten in Greater LA, one of the largest cities in the world.  Then he said something that struck me as very profound:

Paul, you gave that kitten a chance at life that it would not have had without you. She has a full stomach and a few more days to find a caring home. Without you she would not have had that chance.” 

Gray Kitten Eating

 

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Paul Curran and I love to hear from our readers. You may comment on this post, comment on my Facebook or Twitter pages, or email me at cordeliasmom2012@yahoo.com or notcordeliasmom@aol.com

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Images by:  Lachlan Donald, and Tours Departing Daily, and Otter Valley Railroad, and D Coetzee, respectively

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78 Responses to The Christmas Kitten (Guest Post by Paul Curran)

  1. Victo Dolore says:

    Aw. Sweet story! Merry Christmas!!!

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Thank you Victo, I’m glad you enjoyed it. Thank you so much for dropping by for a read and a comment. I hope your Christmas is a happy one!

      Like

  2. Paul says:

    Thank you very much CM for the chance to guest post again. This story has grown in meaning to me over the years. Especially at Christmas time, but also all year around, when we give to those who are less fortunate than we are, it has always made me fustrated that I couldn’t somehow give them a better life. Once this story sank in, I realized that every meal we give, every blanket or every pair of mittens, adds to the chance that others will make it, increases their quality of life, helps to give them hope. There are no guarentees in this life, all we can do is help others – so often outcomes are not ours to determine.

    Have a very Merry Christmas CM to you and your family and your readership. And a may the New Year bring happiness and hope.

    Like

  3. The Hook says:

    This was simultaneously enlightening and heartbreaking.
    God bless you, Paul. And lost kittens everywhere.

    Like

  4. Outlier Babe says:

    Aw, ya’ big softie! Another good one, Paul. I actually dislike cats, but no one can dislike kittens, and anyone with a soul feels for a young child or animal out on its own too soon. It’s great that you gave it a fighting chance.

    Like

  5. What a sweet story, Paul. It is so hard sometimes to realize you have done your part and to trust in the goodness of humanity, in the team work required for someone else to pick up where you left off. Merry Christmas!

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Merry Christmas IB! May you and yours enjoy peace and health this special season. That too was always my concern – as soon as I stopped – giving the worst would happen. I have learned to trust in God and humanity that acting as a good “neighbor” to humans and animals is all that is required of me – i am not responsible for the outcome of the lives of others , only for treating them with all the respect and kindness that I can. God can and will take it fom there. I guess the kitten taught me that – I had no choice in that case. It was a hard and sad lesson for me.

      Thanks so much for dropping by for a read, i enjoy your blogs and participating.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Karen J says:

      You made a great point that we can all stand a reminder of, now and then, IB! Bright New Years blessings to you and yours ~

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I kind of wish you’d have made up a happy ending. The thought of a defenseless kitten saddens me. Especially on Christmas Day. No matter. Life isn’t all happy endings, is it?

    A hotshot load sound like a recipe for disaster. Do drivers keep pushing to the point of exhaustion? It also sounds kind of dirty, which I’m betting is intentional.

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Yep the dirty part is deliberate – the job is dirty, generally no showering until the end. Ha! We always used double drivers on hotshots. The law regulates how many hours can be driven per driver in a shift, so if the load is going further than 14 hours, a hotshot always pays for two drivers. They can go easy coast to coast without breaking any rules – as long as there is a sleeper berth. The hours of service rules at that time were regularly broken by drivers (not now, the enforcement and fines have been ramped up considerably) BUT back then, the authorities were very vigilant on paperwork for hot shot bcause the temptation was huge for a driver to run alone and collect two patchecks. It was rare for anyone to try a hotshot without two drivers. And fines for being late were humongous. We did hot shot ex Houston and Louisiana for two jack-ups ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackup_rig) based in Halifax and the fines were $25,000 for anything over an hour late (up to a day and then the next 25k fine started). It cost them $250,000 dollars per day to have the rig idle and waiting. When they broke something, they wanted the replacement piece RIGHT NOW. I met a 747 cargo plane from Germany once at JFK and did a hot shot to Halifax. When a shipper uses air for a heavy peice the price is so high that it includes a seat for an attendant to ride with the peice and takecare of it. I offered the the oilfield guy with the piece a ride to Halifax (we had a double bunk sleeper and one driver would always be driving , so there was lots of room for him in the tuck)and he said he would fly and meet us there. We had delivered and were pulling out when he arrived from the Halifax airport by cab – we had beat the plane.

      Anyway Mark, thanks so much for the visit and the read and comment. It is a pleasure to have you here. Merry Christmas!

      Like

      • That’s fascinating. It’s a stand-alone post on its own. Thanks for the lesson, Paul. I wonder how many semis blowing by me are driving by one guy trying to get paid for two? It’s a little unnerving but what are you going to do? Never leave the house?

        Between all of these guest posts you do (I don’t always catch all of them) you could probably be hosting your own site. Just a thought.

        Like

        • Paul may have as much time on my site as he wishes. I even have a category for his posts, so everyone can find them easily. We all love Paul’s posts.

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          • Paul says:

            Awww CM, thank you – you are such a gracious hostess. Have no fear, even when I do get my own blog, I’ll still guest for you. I find it is very helpful to me to have different venues for different stories. I know you are fine with what ever i write, however I do not want to disappoint your followers. Thank you for your open acceptance.

            Like

            • I think my followers have become accustomed to a wide range of subject matters and writing styles, but I agree that some of your stories might do better on another blogger’s site, like maybe Doobster’s. I’m willing to share (but not too much). 🙂

              Like

  7. markbialczak says:

    Great Christmas Day guest post, Paul.

    Your tender heart shows through. Again. Elroy knew you and had a good angle on life with his proclamation that calmed you enough for departure.

    My ending will be a good one. I think your kitty found someplace hospitable and was scooped up by somebody as caring as yourself with conditions better for a permanent commitment. You were needed as a bridge to better things. Sort of like your role in the life of those teens in the convertible in a prior guest post.

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Indeed Mark – faith when we have done our best is a critical concept for me. There is so much on this world that, as individuals, we can only contribute to and not determine the outcome of (how’s that for doubling dangling paticiples). The kitten is a furry example, there are the poor and the disenfranchised, immigrants, the handicapped, etc. I always had a problem with that as it seemed I wasn’t doing enough if i couldn’t come up with a permanent solution for their “problem”. Now I know that I don’t control the outcome and I’m OK with that. I don’t have to solve all the problems of the world – I just have to help and have faith – as Elroy pointed out.

      Elroy is a special person. his grand father and great-grandfather were both ministers. Elroy was a hellion when he was growing up – doing things like blocking the local main highway by setting fire to old tires on Halloween. As he matured he became a very naturally profound person who had a lot of street smarts and a faith that was unshakeable – a faith he never spoke of. He was a brilliant mechanic who was gov’t certified for cars, trucks, heavy equipment, hydraulics, vehicle electronics, etc. At one point he was building race car engines and built the first, second and third place winners in a professional race in eastern Canada. He was magical with wrenches. He got tired of that and bought his own tractor-trailer and leased onto the same company where i worked. We became good friends and did a lot of trucking together. Trucking with Elroy was always a hoot – he would come out with the most spontaneously funny and yet profound stuff. It blew me away and often left me bent over with laughter. He obeyed the law because he saw the value in not harming others and was the most honest thoughtful, caring soul I knew. If the law was stupid, he had no regard for it and was a master at getting around it without drawing attention. He was about caring not rules. Anyway, it was not surprising to me that he came out with that profundity about the kitten. He never spoke of religion – chosing not to as it was such a contentious subject ; he didn’t attend church regularly; he carried no religious symbology; and he he treated all living things as if they belonged here -all humans had equal value to him. And yet there were times when he spoke that you would swear that his words were coming right out of the mouth of God – he could leave you with goose bumps using very simple and yet profound language.

      Anyway, thanks so much for dropping by Mark, it’s a pleasure as always having you visit.

      Like

    • idiotwriter says:

      Oh, I SO agree! 🙂

      Like

  8. socialbridge says:

    What a heart-warming story. Thanks Paul for writing with such sensitivity.
    Happy Christmas!

    Like

  9. June says:

    Dear Paul, I ‘found’ you and this beautiful guest post about the kitten via Jean’s Social Bridge blog, and I am so happy that I have.

    I am now weeping tears of compassion and empathy while and after reading this loving tale about this beautiful little life that you have helped.

    This past Friday, the 19th, I was ‘rescued’ in the form of a beautiful black and silver striped kitten, who looks startlingly like this little angel you made friends with, at a craft market that I am a crafter/trader at.

    Although many people at the market thanked me for deciding (immediately upon finding her there) to take her home with me and rescuing her, it was much more a case of the kitten rescuing me and my broken, grieving heart. This kitten looks so much like, and behaves so much like, the beautiful cat I cared for and loved and nursed for the past 8 and half years, but who succumbed to chronic renal failure this past February.

    My heart has been broken…but this little angel has helped to heal that loss, that heartache. I would go so far as to say that I do believe this little stripey market angel was sent to me, from the heavens (or from The Rainbow Bridge) as Christmas gift from my beautiful and beloved Little B.

    Thank you so much for sharing this beautiful, heartfelt story with us, Paul, but more than that thank you for being the caring and loving soul with the big heart that you most obviously and most definitely have, for giving this beautiful and loving little angel a chance in life.

    Nollaig shona dhuit…happy Christmas to you and all those you love.

    Like

    • What a beautiful story in your comment. I often wonder if there wasn’t a higher power involved in my looking at the SPCA website at the exact same second that Puppy Cody’s picture was posted. Puppy Cody can’t replace the two dogs we lost last year, but she definitely fills a void in my heart. Thank you for reading, and for commenting.

      Like

      • June says:

        Hi CM – I’m so glad I found both Paul and your blog, through Jean’s lovely blog. I think I was meant to ‘find’ you in just the way I have. Without wanting to get all ‘woo woo’ about it, I honestly and genuinely do believe in there being either a higher power or some serious synchronicities at work when things like this happen, at just the moment they do.

        I know the heartache and the heartbreak and the pain and the grief, as well as the void and the gaping hole that is left when our four-legged furry friends pass away. I know and have felt the pain that you’ve felt over losing your beloved Puppy Cody.

        Even my other two beloved cats grieved, for many days, after Little B died. His loss was everywhere…most especially in my heart, which ached and which still does ache, as I miss him so and wish so much there was something more I could have done for him. He was the most loving cat I have ever had the pleasure and privilege to know and to share part of my life with. When this little angel found me last Friday, we bonded instantly. I truly do believe, with all my heart – and again, not to be ‘woo woo’ when I make this statement – that Little B sent this little one to me…to rescue me.

        There’s a saying I read recently on a cat rescue website, that says: ‘when you rescue, you too are rescued.’ Not only do I believe that, but what happened last Friday proved that to be true for me, beyond any shadow of a doubt. I, too, was rescued.

        I’d like to thank Paul, once again, for this beautiful tale of love and caring. I would like to think and believe that in that all-too-short time that Paul and Elroy were with the kitten, you ‘bought’ him some extra time, along with food, safety, shelter, comfort, compassion and love…a little extra precious time that would allow some other kind, generous and loving soul to find him, and bring him (or her) home, to live a long, happy life, filled with much love.

        That is my Christmas wish for that little angel…bless the beasts and the children.

        Like

        • Actually, Puppy Cody is alive and well and sometimes hijacks my blog. It was Morgan and Riggsie that passed away in the last couple of years. I did a post after Morgan passed: https://cordeliasmomstill.com/2014/01/18/changes-and-losses-ii-lifes-sequel/ (have tissues handy, it’s guaranteed to make you cry). Bless you for your caring soul – the world needs more people like you.

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          • June says:

            Yikes!

            Not to mention ‘Ooops!’

            Forgive my blunder there, CM. My thoughts and my typing weren’t at all in synch (obviously) – I meant to type ‘…losing your two beloved dogs…’ not ‘Puppy Cody,’ hence the somewhat non-sensical reply I left earlier. Thoughts coming at the speed of light, plus it being after midnight here in Ireland (and more than just one glass of wine) had me tripping over my words. My apologies for that.

            I’m so very sorry and saddened for your loss of both Morgan and Riggsie…but, as I know from losing all the cats, as well as human family members and friends I’ve loved over the years – most recently, my beautiful Little B – that those we love are always with us, alive and well, in our hearts…in our loving memories of them and the joy they brought into our lives. Death cannot steal this from us. I have learned this…and am still learning this.

            Like

    • Paul says:

      Welcome June! Such a wonderful tale you have shared with us. It is heartwarming to know that your new family member now has a warm loving home to live in. Such a beautiful story. I have often thought that we see the work of God and happiness when we open oursleves up to them. It is apparent to me that you did exact;y that, and were rewarded with love and happiness – what you needed to be complete.

      Thank you for the compliment. I am glad you enjoyed the story of The Christmas Kitten and related to it. It was a pleasure to share it with you. Take care and have a very happy Christmas – and thanks for the Gaelic nlessing, my grandfather was from County Cork.

      Like

  10. List of X says:

    I don’t think truck driver’s life is really fit for a cat, so I hope someone with more stationary lifestyle had found and adopted that kitten.

    Like

    • Paul says:

      I could teach her how to drive. Ha! Hi X – thanks for dropping by. It’s a pleasure to see you here. i wouldn’t have considered taking the cat trucking, other than to transport her to a new location. I wasnt really thinking about what to do had I found the kitten – I was just upset that she had disappeared. I had no desire to possess her, just make sure she was OK. Granted that wasn’t very logical, it was an affair of the heart. I’m not a fan of confining an animal to a vehicle for human enjpyment. There may be some exceptions, but generally it is against an animal’s nature. I do know a lot of guys that do it though – mostly with small dogs.

      Thanks so much for the visit, it is an honor to have you read and comment. Thank You.

      Like

      • Barry says:

        I don’t know about teaching a kitten to drive, but teaching dogs to drive has been done.

        Like

        • OMG. That’s exactly how Puppy Cody sits normally, and she is an SPCA dog! Guess I’d better keep an eye on my own vehicle (and keep the keys hidden). Thanks for sharing the video.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Paul says:

          Sign, Only in New Zealand. Bwahahaha! That is funny Barry! Welcome back friend. Where ya been? We missed you. I am honored that you dropped by here for a visit. I hope everything is good for you and yours. Happy Holidays – although it would be Saturday morning there. Take care Barry, it is great to see you back. Please drop by again. The blogger here – CM -is kind enough to allow me to guest post whenever I ask. I have done a few other pieces around too and I usually leave a note over at Doobsters , where I can be found. Still don’t have a new computer to open my own blog, but I’m working on it. Have a great weekend Barry and I hope to see you around – Take Care and be well.

          Liked by 1 person

  11. barbtaub says:

    What a wonderful story, and even more wonderful lesson. I’ve always had a tendency to think I need to fix things, and to feel like I’ve failed if I can’t succeed completely. But you and Elroy are so right—sometimes it’s enough to improve things as much as you can, and trust that the rest of the help will be there when needed. Thank you so much, and I hope you have a joyous Christmas and peaceful new year.

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Thanks so much Barb for the read and the compliment. I am honored that you dropped by for a visit, Yes , i still have to fight the urge to “fix” things. That being said, I find that having faith that when we give the asisstance we can, that it will work out. This gives me considerable more peace in life.

      Have a great Holiday Season Barb and I wish you and yours the very best.

      Like

  12. idiotwriter says:

    So many thoughts come to mind reading this beautifully told tale Paul.
    The message within it is wonderful – the not knowing though… a killer for sure. Leaving when you have done what you can with what you have is so flippin hard, and you never forget the little kitten.
    Is that a picture of the ACTUAL kitty?

    As for these drives you do… sheees… !!

    Like

    • idiotwriter says:

      …drives you have DONE… 😛

      Like

    • Paul says:

      Hi Belinda! So pleased that you could drop by for a visit. I didn’t carry a camera at the time of this story – except for some disposables to use at an accident scene – so that is not the real kitty. BUT, we searched he interwebs high and low for a pic that looked exactly like the original. We went though hundreds of kitty pics – before CM found that one. It is a perfect match to my memory. The color, the look, the age – it could have been taken of the original. The distances long-haul drivers have to go over here in Norh America are very large. So, the trip was – distance wise – the equivalent of more than 1/4 the way around the world at the equator (28,000 miles) Typically we drove (single) about 120,000 miles a year or the equivalent of of about 4 times around the world. There is so much emptiness here in the center of the continent that the miles go by fast. Europe is very much denser settlement and I am sure that trucking there involves much more work to travel he same distance.

      I was pleased to hear that you and your family had a great Christmas. I look forward to enjoying your work in the New Year. Thanks again for dropping by Belinda- I am honored.

      Like

      • idiotwriter says:

        Thank you Paul!
        I swear reading about all that mileage… makes me think twice about winging about my driving time… lol.
        I guess trucking is a lifestyle though as much as a job… cant imagine much time for ‘normal life’ in-between all that.
        Maybe why that kitty was such a treat and also such a heartbreak ❤

        Like

        • Paul says:

          Indeed,you are right on all points. There are many different types of commercial driving here and some get the home nightly. I chose to do long-haul which is basically go out and stay out. Many drivers lived close to the head office, so they got home when they passed through. Not much life outside of trucking. Basically you’re married to the truck. The big difference between that and the driving you do, is that you are driving to get somewhere and I drove simply to drive. It is the journey whereas yours is about the destination. When I had a load on that was late or the schedule was tight, it became about the destination – and I disliked that. It was stressful. Most of the time I had the time to get there comfortably just driving in a human manner (proper rest, eating well, showering when i wanted, etc.)

          And you are right, the kitten represented “home” per se and was particularly attractive in a word of no fixed geographical location.

          Like

  13. Ned's Blog says:

    What a beautiful story, Paul, and an act of kindness I don’t find surprising coming from you. It’s true that the best we can do in this life is to pass along our kindness to others — human or otherwise — as best we can. Thanks for this message, told with heart and insight.

    My best wishes to you always, my friend 😉

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Thanks so much for dropping by Ned. It’s a pleasure to see you here. I am glad that you enjoyed the story and thank you very much for the compliment – it means the so much to me coming from a professional writer.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. ksbeth says:

    what a beautiful and sweet story, paul. your kindness shows through –

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Thank you so much Beth – I’m glad that you enjoyed the story. I try to be aware of and kind to animals (and people- Ha!) who cross my path. It really doesn’t take much and it makes my life and theirs a lot happier. I hope the New Year brings you and yours peace and prosperity. I look forward to your excellent daily posts

      Like

  15. ~ Sadie ~ says:

    Merry Christmas Paul, though a few days late, sincere just the same!! This is such a sweet, touching, honest story about life and the way we all intertwine in each other’s stories. I love what you wrote – “I have learned to trust in God and humanity that acting as a good “neighbor” to humans and animals is all that is required of me – I am not responsible for the outcome of the lives of others, only for treating them with all the respect and kindness that I can.”
    This is truly all most of us can do, but this, what can amount to such small gestures, can be the one thing that makes the difference in whether one survives the day, and could actually change destinies. You are a good man, Paul & I love your storytelling! I’d like to think that cute little kitten found a good home, after you gave it a day of love, companionship and nourishment!

    Here’s wishing 2015 is a marvelous year for us all!!! ❤

    P.S. – I was so hoping Santa would bring you a laptop!! 😉

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Hi Sadie! Great to see you visiting. Thank you so much for the read and the compliment. Yes, I too pray that the kitten found a loving home. I like happy endings, but unfortinately we aren’t always priviledged to see theoutcome. I wish you and yours a very Happy New Year, may it bring you and yours health and prosperity.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Oh, am I a sucker for a lost kitty story. We had a similar story years ago at a motel in NM. A small almost cat. We left some cat food with the desk clerk who actually seemed to care and said she’d feed it. And left on faith unable to do more.
    What you did was an act of great kindness. Paths cross for a reason. You did what needed to be done. And then paths diverged. No doubt for Christmases in later years, small kittens cuddled close around an ancient granny cat who delighted them with the tale of Christmas angels appeared when she needed it most – and provided, asking nothing in return. And allowed her the freedom to go on. Purrfect story.
    May your “In-Between Week” be a warm one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Hey Phil! I too am a sucker for lost kitties. I’m so glad you enjoyed the story. Your ability to spin a tale never ceases to amaze me – the old nanny cat with kitties gathered around. Such a warm idea. Thanks so much for the compliment. i hope the New Years brings happiness and prosperity to you and yours.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Aussa Lorens says:

    Aw, that is a sweet story. I very much need to find a kitten. This is the only way I could convince the Feyonce to let me keep it…

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Aussa! Your alive! Whew. had us worried there for a bit. Thanks so much for dropping by for a read. I’m glad you enjoyed the story and would your dog be OK with a kitten?

      Like

  18. Elyse says:

    Paul, you have the best stories! You really do need a blog.

    Happy New Year, Paul.

    Like

    • Paul says:

      Thank you so much for the compliment Elyse – I’m glad you enjoyed the story. i’m saving my pennies for a new computer with enough power and memory to start a blog

      Happy New Years to you and yours.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Elyse says:

    And Happy New Year to Cordelia’s Mom, too.

    Like

  20. julie says:

    Paul! You have made my eyes sweat! GAH!

    Like

  21. Pingback: A Smiley Christmas to One and All! | Cordelia's Mom, Still

  22. Awww….what a purrrrfect and ameowzing story! (*≧∀≦*)

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Reblogged this on Cordelia's Mom, Still and commented:

    Merry Christmas, Everyone! Please enjoy this 2014 post by Paul Curran, who is sharing this holiday with the original Christ family and all the angels. Rest in peace, my friend.

    Like

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